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Technology 21 January 2019

The Week in Internet News: IoT Hacked? Who Knows?

Grant Gross
By Grant GrossTechnology Reporter

IoT survey: Nearly half of all companies using IoT devices don’t have mechanisms in place to detect if any of their devices have been hacked, according to a survey featured in a Fast Company story. Just 14 percent of the respondents to the Gemalto survey believe providing security is an ethical consideration.

Huge leak: More than 22 million unique passwords and 772 million email addresses were leaked and distributed by hackers in a folder named “Collection #1,” Mashable reports. The cache of emails and passwords were collected from several data, dating back to 2008.

Pushing back: WhatsApp is planning to fight India’s recent crackdown on encryption, FT.com reports. Indian policymakers have proposed rules that would allow authorities to trace the origin of encrypted messages, but WhatsApp says it will protest the proposals.

Fighting fake news: Japan’s government plans to come up with a plan to fight fake news by June, Japan Times says. The plan could include requiring social media companies to create codes of conduct. Several other attempts by governments to fight fake news have led to concerns about censorship, however.

AI as a weapon: Forbes.com has a story raising concerns about the weaponization of Artificial Intelligence. “Artificial intelligence is leading us toward a new algorithmic warfare battlefield that has no boundaries or borders, may or may not have humans involved, and will be impossible to understand and perhaps control across the human ecosystem in cyberspace, geospace and space,” the story says.

Self-aware software: A cryptocurrency mining malware package has become kind of self-ware, The Next Web reports. One form of a common malware has evolved and can now switch off security services to continue mining without being detected.

Read the Internet Society’s IoT Trust Framework, which identifies the core requirements for people from all sectors to understand, assess, and embrace effective security and privacy.

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